“Muscle Machine” by Stelarc (2003)

Artists,Reference — chentsch @ 5:09 pm

stelarc2

The Muscle Machine is a six-legged walking robot, five metres in diameter. It is a hybrid human-machine system, pneumatically powered using fluidic muscle actuators.

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“Poultry Internet” – Adrian David Cheok

Reference — jbrieger @ 5:06 pm

What good is the internet if you can’t hug a chicken through it?

“SixthSense” by Pranav Mistry (2009)

Reference — Tags: — John Mars @ 5:03 pm

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“Retroreflective Optical Camouflage” – Susumu Tachi et al (2003)

Reference,Scientific — jbrieger @ 5:00 pm

Not art, but really interesting technology. Projection onto a special fabric surface that live feeds a camera from behind you.

“montanamex” by Eduardo Garcia (2014)

Artists,Reference — chentsch @ 4:59 pm

“Eduardo Garcia, a chef who lost his arm and now uses advanced mechanical prosthetics to continue the pursuit of his passion: food.”

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“Reverberating Across the Divide” by Madeline Gannon (2013)

Reference — Tags: — John Mars @ 4:59 pm


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“Jaha” by Jaha Inc. (2014)

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“Printing Teddy Bears” by Disney Research (2014)

3_Embedded and Wearable,Reference — dsrusso @ 4:58 pm

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Gwen Stevenson – “Infinite Mass” (2010)

Uncategorized — Ali Momeni @ 4:58 pm

<iframe width=”500″ height=”375″ src=”//www.youtube.com/embed/tW-aOlb2Xjw” frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen></iframe>

<p>”This work is concerned with how we, as human beings, inhabit this world and experience our place in it. We live in both a physical world and a spiritual metaphysical world. Both exist within and around us but are experienced very differently. This work sets up a juxtaposition of forms that suggest this experience. Mass is used as a visual form to convey notions of the bounded physical domain. The unbounded metaphysical domain is conveyed by movement of sound between the forms. The tangible stationary bulk of the suspended spheres co-exist with the intangible ephemerality of the sound piece. “</p>

“Foot Tap Amplifier” by Michael Kontopoulos (2011)

The Foot Tap Amplifier draws the wearer’s attention to their own nervous habits by amplifying them.

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