Final Project – SNAPHACK

 

IMG_2059

Previously, I constructed a giant hamster wheel in some bizarre ritual to help me come to terms with my life as an academic failure (for further coming to terms, please see my forthcoming novel on life-hacks).

10259989_10202478748703810_3956792059323519019_n

I then rolled it several miles up a giant hill, left it in a friend’s garage over and avoided making eye contact with it for the rest of the summer.

Screen Shot 2014-12-03 at 5.47.43 AM

Later, I destroyed it with a hacksaw and left it for dead on the side of the road. R.I.P., giant hamster wheel.

Anyways, it was determined that a giant hamster wheel constructed out of fear and shame was probably a poor choice in final project. This is so true, I totally do not recommend a giant hamster wheel built out of shame to anyone. So instead, I’m going to blog about my first semi-serious foray into Event Planning.

I co-organized SNAPHACK, a social media hackathon, with Miles Peyton (I know you’re all shocked and surprised @ my choice in partner). It was held on September 20th in the Frank-Ratchye STUDIO for Creative Inquiry. It was an all-day event that started at 10am and went until midnight.

Some highlighted projects (aka ones I could snag documentation for) include:

  • Rachel Binx’s Wifi Diary, which was “a tool for chronicling one’s movements and travels, through the lens of different wifi networks”. It’s a background script that takes a picture every time you’re in a new location, which is determined by the change in your SSID. I get a surge of nostalgia every time I have to look through my list of previously connected wifi networks, not because I actually have a fondness for “ATT_WIRELESS_798” or whatever but because I associate them with the places I travelled to, like my home in Ohio or my trip to Italy.

binx-on-wifi--atlascafe_o

  • Me and Lauren McCarthy’s sadAR: Augmented Reality for Bad Days, which was a joke-y augmented reality app that let you change the way you saw things with Instagram-y filters based on your mood.

cardboard

  • Owen Khan’s ObitCoin, a cryptocurrency where you basically just create a death pool and generate currency based on how accurate your predictions are. This is neat-o, but Owen’s worried about like, death, and won’t release the code. )-: I feel ya Owen!
  • More documentation on the official website

If anything, I learned how insanely difficult it is to organize basically anything, especially a thing where people hang out irl for a day. I think I definitely wouldn’t have ordered as much food, nor ordered super carb-y food and tried to get healthy food, like lettuce and sandwiches. Too much pizza just makes me groggy, and same w/ everyone else.

I also would’ve like to have final presentations at the end. It was a really chill event which was great, because it was low-stress and friendly, but there was also no real conclusion.  \-: I would’ve also tried to be more authoritarian/make loud announcements instead of awkwardly motioning people towards food whenever it arrived, but that’s generally a social anxiety issue and probably a more long-term life goal than anything.

Overall though I felt it was a fun experience. It was nerve-wracking and awful to plan, and in some ways to execute, but I feel like I have maybe more of a handle on how to plan things now. I went on to plan the B☆A Presentations, a night of short undergraduate artist talks, with Caroline Record, and I thought that was pretty successful too. Maybe I will continue to plan things in the future! Who knows! It gets slightly less painful each time, which is nice.

But regardless, I’m turning this in like two days before the end of classes so this probably isn’t going to be graded, and I’m going to retroactively fail this course. I don’t really care at this point, I learned a lot in this class and will almost inevitably use my newfound projection/CNC routing skills in the future(/already have), which is maybe all that matters. lol! 😉

IMG_2040

“Pinokio” by Shanshan Zhou, Adam Ben-Dror and Joss Doggett(2013)

Artists,Reference,Robotics — Ayo Olubeko @ 10:16 pm


Pinokio is an animatronic lamp that is an exploration into the expressive and behavioral potentials of robotic computing. A webcam, microphone, servos, and halogen globe are hacked along with Arduino and OpenCV to bring the lamp to life. More info here

“Missing: An Interactive installation” by Aramique Krauthamer and Kyle McDonald(2012)

Artists,Instrument,Robotics — Ayo Olubeko @ 10:12 pm


The piece was created for the english indie band, The XX. It consists of a room full of stepper motor controlled Sonos speakers that pivot to follow listeners as they move through the space. More info here

“Vincent & Emily” by Nikolas Schmid-Pfähler and Carolin Liebl(2013)

Artists,Instrument,Robotics,Uncategorized — Ayo Olubeko @ 10:08 pm


Vincent and emily are two self-willed robots designed to explore solitude of a partner relationship and their impulses. The robots capture sounds and movement via sensors and react on those signals with their own expressions. More info here

“Void” by Wit Pimkanchanapong (2013)

Artists,Reference,Robotics,Uncategorized — Ayo Olubeko @ 10:01 pm


Void  is a large scale mechanical structure that uses 8 synchronized suspended winches to produce light paintings over the public parking lot in Nagoya, Japan. The piece was inspired by Jurg Lehni’s printer mechanic sculpture. More info here

“Artists, Robots, Simultaneous Portraits” by Alex Kiessling (2013)

Artists,Instrument,Robotics — Ayo Olubeko @ 9:52 pm


In this piece, Viennese artist Alex Kiessling creates three artworks simultaneously in three European cities with the help of two robots. The final result is three independent, yet connected pieces that can be regarded as a global work. More info here

“The Singing Heads” by Nathaniel Mellors(2009)

Artists,Reference,Robotics — racheljpark @ 5:23 pm

This is a kinetic sculpture by Nathaniel Mellors. It only moves, but it also makes sounds. As the audience experiences this piece, they hear words”freedom” from three heads. It is quite indistinguishable if they are serenading freedom, or asking for their freedom. Uncanny feeling comes from the object looking very realistic. The piece was displayed with a price tag with $75000. more here.

-I had a hard time finding the original title of this piece

“Miyata Jiro” by Momoyo Torimitsu(1997)

Artists,Reference,Robotics — racheljpark @ 5:01 pm

This crawling robot was made by a Japanese artist to symbolize the decline of Japan’s economy. It is a robot that has a very simple mechanism, but because it has such a realistic appearance, it becomes uncanny. It not only exists as a sculpture, but it also becomes an element in public performance.

.More Here.

“World’s first manned flight with an electric multicopter” by e-volo (2011)

Artists,Reference,Robotics — Flora @ 4:57 pm

This could be the future of aviation, piloting a vehicle as easy as a car. for more information on the group go here.

“Paul the robot drawing Patrick” by Patrick Tresset(2011)

Artists,Reference,Robotics — racheljpark @ 4:55 pm

This robot draws a portrait of a person who is sitting in front of the camera. It questions what robots can’t do and what humans can’t do. This robot draws, more accurately than an artist can. When all it does is replicate the figure in data, is it really art?

More here.

Next Page »
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 Unported License.
(c) 2017 Urban Intervention | powered by WordPress with Barecity