List of Systems – Swetha Kannan ( 2014 )

Here is a list of systems in my life. Underneath each system I have also added ways in which I can mess up the system by changing something about the feedback:

  1. Cooking:
    Input: Hunger
    Output: Satisfaction
    Feedback: Talent/skill
    Other Factors: Diet, time, peopleCook dishes have never cooked before for a day
    Only cook what I can make within 5 minutes.
    Assemble all pics of food I have eaten over the past few years (I always take pics of new things I eat/ cook)
  2. Communication:
    Input: Necessity
    Output: Knowledge gained or given
    Feedback: Urgency
    Other Factors: intelligence, language, personal vs. professionalRespond to all email, text, etc, that I receive within a day
    Speak with a thick Indian accent for a day
  3. Religion
    Input: Belief
    Output: Tradition
    Feedback: Passion
    Other Factors: Family, culture, time, dedicationTry reading a religious text that is not from my religion
    Attend another religions’ meeting
  4. Language
    Input: Idea
    Output: Communicate
    Feedback: Audience
    Other Factors: Culture, Family, Friends, Location, SpeciesSpeak Tamil to everyone for one day
  5.  Transportation
    Input: Leave
    Output: Arrive
    Feedback: Distance
    Other Factors: Weather, Time, CompanyVisit a PAT public meeting
    Walk to all destinations regardless of distance
    Wait for 1 specific bus the whole day
  6. Hygiene
    Input: routine
    Output: Clean
    Feedback: Tolerance (of feeling dirty)
    Other Factors: Family, Friends, Responsibilities, SocietyDedicate 2 hours for brushing my teethe
    Bathe in ice cold water for a week
  7. Study
    Input: Confused
    Output: Understand
    Feedback: Skill
    Other Factors: Interest, tiredness, timeAttend academic development
    Attend study sessions for 1 day (even if I do not take the class)
  8. Relationships
    Input: Lonely
    Output: Support System
    Feedback: Maintenance (keeping in touch)
    Other Factors: Who?, Family, Professional vs. Personal, memories, grudgesRespond to all email, texts, social media, that I receive in a day (even if it is spam)
    Write letters to everyone that I have not kept in touch with
  9. Reading
    Input: Curiosity
    Output: Knowledge
    Feedback: Time/speed
    Other Factors: Interest, personal vs assigned, genre, lengthOnly read Magazines for one day
    Read texts that are not assigned and are not interesting for me
  10. Sleeping
    Input: exhausted
    Output: refreshed
    Feedback: Time
    Other Factors: work, tiredness, Parents, schedule, rulesDo not sleep for a night
    Sleep with hourly interruptions
    Spend a day where you sleep for an hour, work an hour, sleep, work, sleep, etc
  11. System That I changed for 1 day:
    Self – improvement
    Input: Need to Change
    Output: Become a better person
    Feedback(negative) : criticism
    Feedback(Positive) : Praise
    Other Factors: work, professionalism, self-esteem, confidence, societyIn this system, I found it interesting that the system has clear negative and positive feedbacks. However, People most often seek to improve themselves through criticism even though positive reinforcement (praise) is proven to work better. I believe that this system is closely tied in with societal norms or pressures; if someone seeks praise then they are labelled as narcissistic, over-confident, and more. It is also hard to receive praise since we are not trained on how to graciously accept it. To break this system, I spent a day trying to let everyone on my contacts list know what great things they’ve done for me or just how special they were. After getting past the initial discomfort of writing such wonderful things and sending them out to be judged, it was interesting to see the different reactions.
    Here is a link to the post which Documents this experience: teach.alimomeni.net/2014spring1/?p=4024
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