“Presentation of Works” by Sam Ticknor (2014)

For the final project, students were asked to present their sophomore reviews. Although I completed my  review last year, I used the opportunity to think critically about my practice and re-do my website/artist statement/resume.

My presentation of works contains notes:

 

My website/artist statement/resume can be found here (some projects have not been posted yet)

 

“Red Paper Clip” by Sam Ticknor (2014)

Assignment,Student Work,Submission — SamTicknor @ 12:30 pm

Documentation of the red paper clip project can be found here.

This project was a failure for me. Initially excited about trading, I quickly traded by Bert figurine for half of a cigarette, which I knew I would be in demand once my roommates got home. Shortly after, I traded the cigarette for a mini lighter, which I lost after a few days.

Bert

“Galleromp” by Sarah Croop and Sam Ticknor (2014)

Assignment,Student Work,Submission,Systems Thinking — Tags: — SamTicknor @ 4:57 pm

You can visit our website at galleromp.com.
The documentation is at our secret URL, Documentation

We led participants to believe that they were providing user feedback for our application, Galleromp. Galleromp is an application designed to integrate a digital experience into a physical walk through an area. Specifically, Galleromp was designed to point out and provide information on public murals in the Strip District. However, while discovering the public works in the area, our users were surprised to find us at points along the path, prompting them to contribute their own work to the public space via drawings, performances, and story telling. Galleromp was a journey meant to spark conversation between similar experiences in the digital and physical world.

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“Pillbox” by Sam Ticknor (2014)

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pillboxProjectDocumentationSmall

 

For our tactical assignment on stress culture, I wanted to create a piece on prescription pill abuse as a way to combat/manage stress. I generated illustrations and text commenting on the epidemic with slogans like ‘Trade your  pillows for pills’. I screen printed the new imagery and text over 50 copies of CMU’s art & culture paper, aptly named ‘Pillbox’. These copies were re-released into circulation.

In addition to this work, I collaborated with Maryyann, Ralph, and Andrea on the project posted here. This second tactical intervention was designed to draw attention to the lack of resources and attention for students struggling with mental illness as a result of CMU’s stress culture.

“Everyone’s Invited: Game playing” by Sam Ticknor (2014)

Assignment,Student Work,Submission — SamTicknor @ 3:03 pm

To make this book, I collected card games from several rounds of Estimation. Each player’s hand was recorded into the booklet as well as the cumulative score after each round. I made the decision to collage faces into the book in order to highlight: 1) The strategies and moves that we employ during a card game can be extended into daily life and 2) Reaction to loss, upset, gain, and domination appear to be universal. Although the text of the book may be too cryptic for a viewer with no knowledge of Estimation, the faces provide something that the viewer can relate to/empathize with: the players.

GamePlaying

GamePlaying

GamePlaying

GamePlaying

“Collection” by Sam Ticknor (2014)

Assignment,Student Work,Submission — SamTicknor @ 12:45 pm

Over the week, I collected knots of hair that I found around my apartment. With four long-haired occupants, these hairballs are not in short supply. Often, hair that has been removed from the body is considered ‘gross’ or’disgusting’. As someone who is interested in knotting and weaving, I find a different kind of beauty in these forms. I photographed each ball and post processed the images in order to emphasize the delicate lines that can make the clump so beautiful. Art relies heavily on context.

“10 Systems: Part II” by Sam Ticknor (2014)

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These drawings are the evidence of an experiment.  ‘Spending Free Time’ and ‘Observing Others’ were the primary systems affected by this work.

Instead of spending my free time on Facebook, I sketched the people around me.

Instead of observing others via Facebook, I took a closer look at how people were interacting in the physical world.

“10 Systems: Part I” by Sam Ticknor (2014)

  1. Spending Free Time
    Input: Free time/boredom
    Procedure: Kill time on internet/Observe world around me through computer
    Output: Information I’ve gathered from my time on the web (most often, nothing relevant)
    Feedback: Is the information obtained helpful to me
    Broken: I blocked facebook for a day.  With the time I normally spend on facebook, I was observed and sketched non-virtual people around me.
  2. Artistic Expression
    Input: Desire to make some prints
    Procedure: Gather inks, generate content, screen print protocol
    Output: Prints/Editions
    Feedback: Am I pleased with the product based on the amount of work I put in
    Broken: I decided to try a method of printing that was entirely new to me, CMYK screen printing. Wasn’t entirely pleased with product, but am looking forward to making more CMYK prints in the future.
  3. Grooming
    Input: Hair state in the morning
    Procedure: If hair is manageable, leave it down, else put it up
    Output: How I wear my hair for that day
    Feedback: Does the style I chose positively affect my day
    Broken: Instead of letting my hair decide how it would be worn, I decided the night before, and followed through with my plans 
  4. Pupil Life
    Input: Prompt for class assignment
    Procedure: Generate ideas -> generate work -> submit for critique
    Output: Work to be critiqued
    Feedback: Literal feedback at critique & what I learned about my artistic process
    Broken: I am weary of creating work for critique. For the first time in a while, I disregarded my assignments and made some work for myself, a couple stuffed animals.
  5. Stress Relief
    Input: Stress
    Procedure: ‘stress-relievers’, sleep, attempting to ignore stress
    Output: More stress
    Feedback: Are my stressful responsibilities resolved? Due to my poor stress management, no.
    Broken: I dropped a class which will allow me to spend more time on other responsibilities.
  6. Family
    Input: Desire to remain close to family
    Procedure: Text/call family alerting them I want to skype. We begin to skype but when I hear that friends arrive outside of the room, make an excuse to end call and go hang out.
    Output: Guilt, less close with family
    Feedback: Am I happy with my relationships with my family.
    Broken: This weekend, I set aside an hour and a half to skye with my parents. I made sure that I did not make some excuse to leave the conversation early.
  7. Capital
    Input: Need for funds
    Procedure: Work at the Miller Gallery
    Output: Money
    Feedback: Enough funding? Do I feel OK about the way that I’ve made money?
    Broken: I feel like a lazy individual at the Miller Gallery. So, I took an extra shift at the Children’s Museum this weekend. Next, I want to start selling prints/sewing works
  8. Learning
    Input: Homework assignment
    Procedure: Wait until the last minute, don’t attend lecture, scramble to finish homework
    Output: Mediocre homework assignment turned in
    Feedback: Grade
    Broken: Took some more initiative in a group project, started early
  9. Collecting
    Input: Everything
    Procedure: Hoard it
    Output: Messy room, too much stuff to handle
    Feedback: Can I even walk through my room anymore?
    Broken: Cleaned room, put a lot of things in a bag to bring to Makeshop
  10. Sharing Space
    Input: Roommate’s mood
    Procedure: If stressed, avoid
    Output: Resentment
    Feedback: # of times we have a good time together vs. # of times we have a bad time
    Broken: Instead of avoiding her when she was stressed about a homework assignment, I helped her complete it.
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