“Look Inside!” by Connor Brem (2014)

What happens if I look inside?

Curiosity is a powerful force. Look Inside! explores how people react when presented with a non-descript box and an offer to look inside.

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If people choose to peer inside the box, they find a mechanical drum set, which begins to play a simple but incessant beat. The beat grows in speed and intensity, and the box begins to shake!

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At this point, people interacting with the piece have a choice: back away and attempt to dissociate themselves from the commotion they’ve caused, or keep watching. When Look Inside! was displayed, some people ran, and some stayed. Some even came back to play again.

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Look Inside! explores curiosity, responsibility, and control. Would you look inside?

Smart 3D Pen Research

“FreeD” by Amit Zoran. 2013

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Amit references

“Haptic Intelligentsia” by Joong Han Lee. 2012

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Amit uses magnets for 3D tracking. I found this website that appears to be a DIY. Maybe I can work on this for another project if the Leap works.

I was worried it wouldn’t so I did a lot of research on 3D magnet tracking, which is still an option maybe…maybe I’ll save it for another project. I’ll post some links just so people can see what I was thinking about if you’re interested.

DIY Magnet Tracker Sites
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 Understanding the limitations of the pen. Make sure it can work with how I want to use it.

Understanding the limitations of the pen. Make sure it can work with how I want to use it.

THE LEAP WORKS!

Pen over Leap

“Ships to Sail the Void” by Connor Brem (2014)

Arduino,Python,Robotics,Software,Student Work — connorbrem @ 10:31 am

“When ships to sail the void between the stars have been built, there will step forth men to sail these ships.”

― Johannes Kepler

Satellites are funny things. It’s easy to forget how rapidly they circle the earth: it takes us a day to make a full rotation, but some satellites can complete an orbit in an hour and a half. At those speeds, reality is warped, and time bends.

What’s even stranger is that one of these satellites, the International Space Station, has people in it.

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“Ships to Sail the Void” plots the trajectory of the Space Station with a laser that it shines onto nearby surfaces. When it is activated, it takes a minute to show the path that the Space station will take over the next one hundred minutes.

Every time that it runs, it pulls fresh data from the satellite database at n2yo.

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It brings the strange, distant concept that is space travel down from the void, into your room.

“Dragonstone” by Jolan van der Wiel. (2014)

I envision myself using some unpredictable-predictable type of material. Something like this next project’s play with material properties is particularly fascinating, as I have always been interested in new material applications.

Dragonstone | Jólan van der Wiel from Mir Motion on Vimeo.

Dealing with magnetic clay allows for a high level of unpredictability due to the complex inherent nature of clay, yet also has another level of predictability due to the magnetic properties. Knowing the behavioral limits allows for some aspect of the fabrication to happen naturally without interference, such as the way the clay falls out, but it happens within boundaries so that the designer can control the general shape.

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Can I get some advice from you guys on what I could do? It doesn’t have to be cymatics, necessarily. I think I was interested in cymatics for reasons like I mentioned above, where there is a level of control and un-control. A compromise between the natural effect and the designer’s intentions. However, I feel unhappy with the limitations of my project on what I’m imagining it could “be”, and a performance installation for a concert isn’t what I really want.

My one sentence description would be something more like:

Compromising the designer’s control with the unpredictable nature of [??a material??] accomplished by implementing [??a hybrid instrument??]

Proposal: “Noise” by Connor Brem (2014)

Arduino,Audio,Final Project,Robotics,Sensors — connorbrem @ 11:09 pm

“Noise” will be a collaborative, physical music-looping device.

“Security Blanket” by Security Blanket (2014)

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“Meet Your Creator” by Marshmallow Laser Feast—Robin McNicholas, Memo Akten (2012)

Artists,Digital Art,Reference,Robotics — chentsch @ 5:08 pm

” In a tightly choreographed show, light is sculpted around the room using mirrors and spotlights by a dancing troupe of LED drones built and programmed specifically for the show.”

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“BOX” by Bot & Dolly, 2013

Digital Art,Robotics,Visual — ypag @ 3:58 pm

Box from Bot & Dolly on Vimeo.

“Any sufficiently advanced technology in indistinguishable from magic.” Arthur C Clarke

BOX consists of 3 robotic arms- two for the screens and one for the camera. All three robotic arms are synched together to create an immersive audio visual experience. 2D space is transformed into 3D using projection mapping. The narrative and visuals illustrate principles of magic!

Making of BOX

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Enchanted Object: “BETRAYAL BOT!” by Dan Russo and John Mars

BETRAYAL BOT! takes trust as its input, and returns betrayal as a result. The robot will ask for your phone under the pretense of charging it — all will appear as normal until you try to take your phone back. That’s when BETRAYAL BOT! springs into action: he’ll immediately drive away as fast as he can, taking your phone with him while leaving all sense of safety behind. BETRAYAL BOT! is your best friend and your worst nightmare.

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